The River Ribble

Walking in The Ribble Valley

Introduction

The Ribble Valley is a paradise for walkers of all abilities. From a short stroll by the river to a strenuous walk across the Bowland Fells - you can have it all.

The Ribble Valley is ideal for walking the 'Ribble Way'.

This way marked 70 miles (113km) long route, follows the course of the River Ribble from its source at Ribblehead, high in the Yorkshire Dales, to the estuary at Preston.

The route passes through a variety of landscapes including limestone gorge, open moorland and tidal marsh. To walk the whole way is a challenge for the most intrepid walkers but it can be walked in sections.

Visit Edisford Picnic Site in Clitheroe and you'll see the beautifully commissioned plinth and plaque, by the Rotary Club of Ribblesdale, which depicts the River Ribble from source to sea.

Alternatively there are 5 short circular walks of between 2.5 and 5.5 miles based on Clitheroe and the villages of Bolton-by-Bowland, Slaidburn, Dunsop Bridge and Bashall Eaves. Each walk takes in the many attractions and interesting features of the landscape and local surroundings.

Journey Through the Centre of the Kingdom.

The very popular 46 mile (75km) walk that takes you through many of the historic sites in the district to the village of Dunsop Bridge, which has been determined by the Ordnance Survey as the nearest point to the centre of the British Isles.

'Journey through the Centre of the Kingdom' starts at the Norman Castle which dominates the historic market town of Clitheroe, your journey will take you to a ruined Cistercian abbey, a number of beautiful late medieval churches, and the homes of two 'traitors' - one who betrayed his king during the Wars of the Roses, and another who was executed for his rebellion against religious changes. The dramatic history is accompanied by equally dramatic scenery in this beautiful part of Lancashire.

Gisburn Forest
Gisburn Forest is the largest forest in Lancashire with a network of forest walks and a cycle trails of 10 miles (16km).

Walking is a great way to explore the forest and the best way to spot wildlife. There are 3 way-marked walks for an easy introduction to the forest and for the more adventurous, a detailed map may be needed to negotiate the numerous other tracks and paths that wind through the forest.

Clitheroe Walks
These new walks set around the beautiful Clitheroe countryside have proved very popular with residents and visitors alike.

There are now 4 individual walks, which are aimed for all abilities and range from 2 to 5 miles long.

For details on all these walks visit Ribble Valley Walks or telephone Clitheroe Tourist Information on 01200 425566.


Last Updated: 28 Apr 2015