Somerset Beaches Information Guide

...glorious sandy beaches and rocky shoreline for fossil hunting and rock pooling

Guide to the coastline and beaches in Somerset from Porlock Weir in West Somerset round to Clevedon in North Somerset. There are sandy beaches for family games and sunbathing with plenty of attractions and activities as well as rocky stretches ideal for rock pooling and fossil hunting.


Berrow Beach
Berrow Beach is part of a six mile stretch of sand from Burnham-on-Sea to Brean Down and is the second longest stretch of sand in Europe. It is a great location for long walks, windsurfing, sea angling and horse riding. The beach is backed by dunes that are full of wildlife.

At low tide a wide exposure of soft sand and mud is exposed leading to the water's edge, but note that it is very dangerous to approach the water at low tide.

The beach is patrolled by wardens from May 1st to September 30th. There are toilets, cafés and other amenities close by. Dogs are welcome on this beach and horse riding is also allowed.

Blue Anchor Beach
Blue Anchor Beach is rocky and is the ideal spot for fossil and crystal hunting. The limestone in the rocks sparkles with a pink hue and the cliffs are of great geological interest.

Brean Beach
Brean Beach is the northern most part of a six-mile stretch of sands from Burnham on Sea. It has extensive flats and it is ideal for walking, beach sports and horse riding, but please be careful of the mud flats at low tide that can be dangerous. Ice creams and fast food are often sold on the beach at the car park area in spring and summer.

The beach is patrolled by wardens from May 1st to September 30th. Vehicles can park on this beach during the day in designated parking areas. Visitors should respect the warning notices about the dangers of mud along this beach. Dogs are welcome on this beach.

Brean Cove
The quiet rural sandy beach at Brean Cove, with amazing views of Brean Down. It is a popular place for horse riding along the beach, and dogs are also welcome. At low tide a wide exposure of soft sand and mud is exposed leading to the water's edge but remember that the tide rises faster near Brean Down and it is also dangerous to approach the water at low tide due to mud. You should respect the warning notices and keep off the rocks of the Down as they can be slippery, especially when wet. Climbing is not allowed and is extremely dangerous.  

The beach is patrolled by wardens from May 1st to September 30th. Vehicles can park on the beach during the day in designated areas or you can park your car at the National Trust car park beside Brean Down.

Visitors to Brean Down should use the steps or roadway near the Bird Garden. Public toilets are available next to the Brean Down cafe.

Burnham Beach Lighthouse Area
This is the start of a six mile length of beach offering wide-open expanses of sand with dunes at the top of the beach. You have to see the famous lighthouse on wooden stilts.

This beach is patrolled by wardens from May 1st to September 30th. Dogs are welcome here all year round.

Take note that it is very dangerous to approach the sea at low tide due to sinking sand and mud. There is unfortunately little parking in this area, with the nearest spot being Burnham seafront. You can then walk out to the lighthouse in about 15 minutes.

Burnham Main Beach
Burnham Main Beach is an award winning wide sandy beach and is patrolled by lifeguards 10am-6pm from May 1st to September 30th (denoted by yellow and red flags). It is good for swimming and has plenty of kids entertainment, including donkey rides, throughout the summer months. Close by there is a designated areas for boats and jet skis.

The famous pier is just moments away and there are a variety of shops and cafes. Parking is available on the seafront and at Morrisons supermarket and public toilets and showers are available at the Tourist Information Centre. Take note that it is dangerous to approach the sea at low tide. Dogs are banned from the beach all year.

Burnham North Beach
Burnham North Beach is a much loved location for families to enjoy a day out. There is a sea wall, and natural sea water boating pool for the children, and a handful of pubs and shops for the adults. Parking is available along the seafront and public toilets are available at Burnham Swimming Pool.  It is very dangerous to approach the sea at low tide here. Dogs are banned from this beach from May 1st to September 30th.

Burnham South Beach
Burnham South Beach has a sandy area close to the jetty, and as you go towards the River Parrett there are pebbles, mud and marshland. This beach is an idyllic spot to stroll along and observe the birds which fly in from Stert and Apex Wildlife Park.

Parking is available on the seafront and at Morrisons supermarket and public toilets and showers are very close by at the Tourist Information Centre. The sea wall steps provide good seats. It is dangerous to approach the sea at low tide. Dogs are banned from this beach from May 1st to September 30th.

Clevedon Beach
Clevedon beach in the northern corner of Somerset offers great views across the Severn estuary towards Wales. The pebble beach has lots of rock pools to amuse adults and children alike and is dominated by the traditional Victorian Pier. The seafront includes public gardens, a traditional bandstand, as well as a range of visitor attractions and amusements.

Also close by is the Clevedon Marine Lake which was built in 1929 which works like a lagoon to hold in the sea water when the tide goes out and is an enjoyable place to swim and paddle.

Doniford Bay Beach
Doniford Bay has a large expanse of shingle and rocky beach ideal for rock pooling and fossil hunting.

Dunster Beach
Dunster is a sand and shingle beach, with a wide open feel and good swimming conditions. There are chalets overlooking the beach, making it the perfect destination for a relaxing break by the sea.

Minehead Beach
Minehead has a long sandy beach which stretches for a mile with a few areas of pebbles and shingle around the harbour. The beach has great views across the Bristol Channel towards Wales.

There are a wide range of facilities including deckchair and windbreak hire. Minehead beach is accessible for wheelchairs, there are public toilets and pay & display parking.

At the top of the beach is a long promenade with plenty of shops and restaurants.
There is a seasonal dog ban on Minehead beach that runs annually from 1st May to 30th September, the ban extends from the harbour end to the golf course

Porlock Weir Beach
Porlock Weir Beach is a shingle beach which stretches about four miles, backed by wildlife rich marshland. It is on the South West Coast Path, with walks along the beach or to Porlock Marsh. The pretty harbour is a popular spot for fishing and sailing.

Weston Super Mare Beach
Weston has a very long sandy beach that is packed with entertainment including the famous Weston donkeys. The Grand Pier is the main attraction although lots of other events take place on and around the beach throughout the year. It is ideal for families. Weston has the second highest tidal range in the world, at a massive 15 meters which exposes vast mud flats. This makes it very dangerous to approach the sea at low tide and has given rise to the name Weston super Mud over the years.
 

Last Updated: 28 Apr 2015