Llawhaden Castle

Introduction

Llawhaden was built by the Normans as a defence against the Welsh and to protect the rich estates of the Bishops of St Davids. It is more a fortified residence than a castle and is set in the village of Llawhaden, approx 7 miles east of Haverfordwest.

Llawhaden was built by the Normans as a defence against the Welsh and to protect the rich estates of the Bishops of St Davids. It is more a fortified residence than a castle and is set in the village of Llawhaden, approx 7 miles east of Haverfordwest. Originally built in the 11thC as a ringwork of earth and timber, typical of the time, in 1193 the fortress was destroyed. Early in the 13thC it was rebuilt by the Bishops of St David’s, although following the original lay-out, it now had a stone circular wall and two flanking towers; one circular and the other semi-circular and both of which survive today.
Considerable improvements were made in the early 14thC by Bishops Thomas Bek and David Martyn. Major extensions were came in the late 14thC when the imposing gatehouse was built and lavish accommodation for visiting dignitaries was added.
Nearby are the remains of a hospital founded in 1287 by Bishop Bek. It cared for the sick and infirm until the 16thC when the Bishops of St. David’s moved to Abergwili.

Llawhaden 7 miles east of Haverfordwest on the A40

Last Updated: 28 Apr 2015


An idyllic small-holding nestled amongst trees and fields without any passing traffic. Guests have their own entrance and lounge and are welcome to stay and relax here all day if they wish.