Pembrokeshire National Park

Introduction

Pembrokeshire begins at Amroth in the south and ends at Poppit Sands in the north and takes in the whole of Wales’s most westerly headland. Home to many of Wales’s largest beaches and indeed more blue flag beaches than any other county in the UK, Pembrokeshire remains largely unspoilt.

Pembrokeshire begins at Amroth in the south and ends at Poppit Sands in the north and takes in the whole of Wales’s most westerly headland. Home to many of Wales’s largest beaches and indeed more blue flag beaches than any other county in the UK, Pembrokeshire remains largely unspoilt.

The entire coastline has been designated a National Park and as such, has been protected from unsightly developments. The coastal path which runs all the way from Amroth up to Cardiganshire, is 186 miles of the most fantastic and rugged scenery in the UK. Its charm lies in the diverse nature of the path as it starts at the seaside village of Amroth and meanders along the cliff top to Tenby above the pretty little harbour. From here the path winds over the cliffs to St Govan’s Head and across the large sweeping beaches at Freshwater West, home to the Welsh National Surfing Championships as the surf is excellent.


The path then turns back inland as it follows the Daugleddau estuary to the county town of Pembroke . Here you can stop and take in the spectacular Norman Pembroke Castle and the ancient ramparts. The path then crosses over the river to Neyland and on to Milford Haven before heading North towards at St David’s, traversing, en route the fabulous beaches at Broad Haven and Newgale, another excellent surfing spot. Porthclais offers a stunning view across to the Isle of Ramsey, a haven for Dolphins, seals and a myriad of seabirds.


A stop at the city of St David’s is a must. The smallest city in the UK and birthplace of Wales’s patron saint, St David’s has an enchanting cathedral and a fantastic ruin of the Bishop’s Palace. Onwards and upwards as the path then heads north east to the town of Fishguard, which has an interesting “last Invasion” history and a tapestry to commemorate it. Finally the walk to St Dogmael’s takes in the awesome Preseli Hills, the name gave rise to the theory that Elvis Presley has a Welsh history, especially given that his mother was called Gladys! The stone from these hills provided the stone for Stonehenge.

Pembrokeshire is littered with picture postcard villages such as Tenby, Saundersfoot, Manorbier and Solva.

Pembrokeshire has more blue flag beaches than any other county in the UK. Long stretches of golden sands and turquoise blue water offer visitors the chance to sample many water sports activities, such as surfing, and coasteering. Much of the Pembrokeshire coast is protected as it forms part of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park. The coastal path is 186miles long and traverses craggy precipitous cliffs, beautiful beaches and rippling sparkling estuaries.

Places to visit in Pembrokeshire:

Barafundle | Boncath | Bosherston | Broad Haven | Caldey Island |
Castlemartin | Dale | Druidston Haven | Fishguard | Freshwater East |
Freshwater West | Grassholm Island | Haverfordwest | Lamphey | Little Haven | Manorbier | Marloes | Martletwy | Milford Haven | Newgale |
Newport | Nolton Haven | Pembroke | Saundersfoot | Skokholm Island |
Skomer Island | Solva | Stackpole | St David’s | St Govan’s |
Tenby |

Last Updated: 28 Apr 2015


If you're looking for a place to stay for a relaxing break or you have a more active holiday in mind, David and Janet and their team would like to welcome you in to their home. "We have 7 large bedrooms to offer, with magnificent sea views. And, because we face West, we enjoy great sunsets every evening."