Fishguard harbour

Fishguard Holiday and Accommodation Guide

Introduction

Perched on a hilltop overlooking the Lower Town and the neighbouring town of Goodwick. It is often thought of as a thoroughfare to and from the ferry to Rosslare, but a stop off would prove that it is much more than that.

Fishguard – Abergwaun

Perched on a hilltop overlooking the Lower Town and the neighbouring town of Goodwick. It is often thought of as a thoroughfare to and from the ferry to Rosslare, but a stop off would prove that it is much more than that.


Location

On the north coast of Pembrokeshire

Directions

From Carmarthen take the A40 to Haverfordwest, where the road bears north towards Fishguard.

From Cardigan take the A487 directly to Fishguard.

By coach

No 411 runs from Haverfordwest and St David’s every two hours, Monday to Saturday, two to three on Sunday.
No 412 runs from Haverfordwest and Cardigan hourly, Monday to Saturday, and two on Sunday.
Both are run by Richards Brothers.
National Express coaches to and from London run from Haverfordwest.

By Rail

The train schedules run in time with the ferry times, twice daily from Fishguard to London.

Ferry Terminal

The ferry terminal is on Quay road, with ferry and catamaran services to and from Rosslare in Ireland.
Stena Line runs the ferries, tel:0870 421126 Click here for Stena Line


Brief History of Fishguard

In 1797, Jemima Nicholas, the 47yr old wife of a cobbler, is said to have single-handedly rounded up 14 French soldiers with a pitchfork! The invaders believed that the British would join their cause to liberate Paris. They planned to land in Bristol however, strong winds blew them off course and they landed just south of Fishguard. They became quickly enamoured with the local brew and surrendered to the locals at The Royal Oak pub, having seen “several thousand” troops. There was no such army in the area and it is more likely that the drunken Frenchmen saw local women marching towards them wearing what is now called the national costume: a black stovepipe hat and red shawl. An outfit easily mistaken for the uniform of a British Redcoat! The French immediately surrendered! The heroine of this “Last invasion of Britain”, Jemima Nicholas is buried in the beside the parish church, behind The Royal Oak.

In 1997, to celebrate the bicentennial, a tapestry was made inspired by the slightly more famous one at Bayeux, France.

In the early 1970s, the town was the setting for the Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor film of “Under Milk Wood”.

Geography of Fishguard

The town of Fishguard is perched on a hilltop overlooking the Lower Town and the neighbouring town of Goodwick. It is often thought of as a thoroughfare to and from the ferry to Rosslare, but a stop off would prove that it is much more than that.

Attractions in Fishguard

The Lower town harbour is home to many pleasure boat providers as basking sharks and dolphins are frequent visitors to the area.
Oceanlab is situated on the seafront at Goodwick, featuring an exhibition of sea and shore life, it is a journey through all things aquatic and is aimed at children.
Easter-October 1000-1700, November - Easter 1000-1600.
Tel: 01348 874737
Horse riding is available nearby at Llanwnda stables, tel:01348 874737

Events in Fishguard

The Annual Fishguard International Music Festival takes place in late July. The festival combines jazz and blues with classical music.

Wining & Dining in Fishguard

There are a few places to eat and drink in Fishguard and Goodwick, including a couple of good pubs and an Indian restaurant.


Nearby Attractions & Towns

The coastline between Fishguard and St David’s is more rugged and wild than that of the south Pembrokeshire, and as such, provides fantastic walking and sightseeing.
Strumble Head west of Fishguard has a lovely lighthouse and is a great place for bird watching as well as dolphin and whale spotting.
Abercastell is a small but delightful village with one pub and a few houses. Just off the coastal path near Abercastell is Carreg Samson with it’s Bronze Age burial chamber, it is a lovely example and well worth a visit.
Trefin is a larger village with the ruin of an old mill near the shore of the beach. The mill, Melin Trefin was deserted in 1918 but made famous in the poem Melin Trefin by William Williams.
Porthgain is a charming village that offers boat trips out to the harbour for dolphin spotting. During the mid 19th century it was an important village as it was the port of export for slate and granite mined at Abereiddy. The Sloop Inn is great pub.


Tourist Information
Tourist Information Centre: Main Square, tel:01348 873484. Easter to Oct.

Parking: Just off the High Street.

Public Toilets:

Churches: St. Mary's
Main St, Fishguard, Dyfed SA65 9HH
Tel: 01348 872895

Holy Name Church
Vergam Terrace, Fishguard, Dyfed SA65 9DF
Tel: 01348 873865

Taxis: Acorn Taxis
Swanleigh Pendre, High St, Fishguard, Dyfed SA65 9AT
Tel: 01348 872797

A.P. Taxis
8-10, Hottipass St, Fishguard, Dyfed SA65 9LJ
Tel: 01348 873774

Carrots Cabs
23, Dan Y Bryn, Fishguard, Dyfed SA65 9LQ
Tel: 01348 872088

Merv's Taxis
3, Trem Y Mor, Fishguard, Dyfed SA65 9DW
Tel: 01348 875129

Doctor: Drs Boughton J.A, Mann M.S & Grimshaw R.J
Health Centre, Rope Walk, Fishguard, Dyfed SA65 9BT
Tel: 01348 873041

Last Updated: 28 Apr 2015


The Llwyngwair Manor Park is set in the 55 acres of grass and woodland of Llwyngwair Estate, and bounded by the River Nevern.