Cilgerran Castle

Introduction

Cilgerran castle was a fortress commanding the river Teifi: both Peter de Wint and J.M.W. Turner have depicted the spectacular grandeur of the castle.

Cilgerran castle was a fortress commanding the river Teifi: both Peter de Wint and J.M.W. Turner have depicted the spectacular grandeur of the castle. The earliest stronghold on or near the site was built for Henry1st to strengthen his hold on the Norman occupation of South-West Wales; the Lordship was granted to Gerald of Windsor. During a Welsh attack on the castle in 1109, Gerald’s wife Nest, the daughter of Rhys ap Tewder, the ruler of Deheubarth, was abducted by Owain Cadwgan, later to become Prince of Powys. Gerald ambushed and killed him seven years later. Cilgerran is first mentioned by name in 1164 when Lord Rhys captured the stronghold. In 1204, William Marshall. Earl of Pembroke regained the castle but not for long. On a major campaign organised by Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, several Welsh castles were taken including Carmarthen, Cardigan and Cilgerran. Llywelyn lost his hold on all three in 1223. William Marshall 2nd set about building a masonry castle at Cilgerran which followed the previous earthwork defences. William 2nd’s distinctive contribution to Cilgerran was the building of two strong towers outside the curtain wall, thereby allowing more space in the inner ward. The outside sections of the wall were much thicker than those facing the inner ward. By the end of the 13thC the castle had come to the end of its useful life – only the threat of a French invasion prompted Edward 111rd to order its refurbishment. In 1405 during the uprising of Owain Glyndwr, the castle was severely damaged. It is now under the guardianship of Cadw.

Opening Times: Standard Hours
Admission: Free
Route: From Cardigan, take A478 Tenby Road South for 3..2 Km. at cross roads, turn East 1..6Km to Cilgerran

Last Updated: 28 Apr 2015


The Llwyngwair Manor Park is set in the 55 acres of grass and woodland of Llwyngwair Estate, and bounded by the River Nevern.